IEEE Talks 5G

IEEE Talks 5G is a series of Q&A articles with IEEE experts on 5G.

James Irvine is chair of the IEEE 5G Web Portal and Content Development Working Group and co-chair of the IEEE 5G Community Development Working Group. He is also Secretary of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society, a past president of the Society and founding editor-in-chief of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine. Dr. Irvine is a Reader in the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, where he leads the Mobile Communications Group. In this interview Dr. Irvine discusses the implications of 5G mobile technology for connected cars, and related topics.

Question: Would you briefly describe your academic work as well as your interest in the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society?

Irvine: My main research interest at the University of Strathclyde is in advanced cellular communications and in wireless security. In essence, we work on security and privacy for future wireless systems. As for the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society, I should mention at the outset that it has a long history. It started as the Vehicular Communications Group in the Institute of Radio Engineers in 1949. In those days, “mobile” phones were car phones, which filled the entire trunk of a vehicle. Today, we have three areas of interest within the Society: mobile communications, automotive electronics and land transportation. Automotive electronics covers collision avoidance, entertainment systems, even electric vehicle propulsion. Land transportation covers public transit such as railways, tramways and metro systems. We’re very much an applications-oriented society. Instead of just looking at underlying technologies, we’re focused on bringing those technologies together to provide products for consumers. Today, more than half the value of a new car is in the electronics. Cars are no longer mechanical devices, they’re primarily electrical devices, even if they rely on traditional internal combustion engines. And the Society bridges a gap between onboard vehicular technology and the wireless communication required for connectivity between vehicles or between vehicles and cellular networks or the cloud.

Alexander M. Wyglinski is co-chair of the Community Development Working Group for IEEE 5G and president-elect of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. He is also Associate Professor of electrical and computer engineering and Director of the Wireless Innovation Laboratory at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. In this interview, Dr. Wyglinski discusses mobile communications and automotive applications and spin-off applications such as the Internet of Things.

Question: Would you briefly describe how you became involved in the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society?

Alex Wyglinski: My involvement with vehicular technology started at the 2000 IEEE Vehicular Technology conference in Boston with my second, published conference paper, and the connection has grown.

My academic interests have revolved around wireless communications and networking. After earning my doctorate in electrical engineering from McGill University in 2005, I moved from Canada to the United States. At the University of Kansas, 2005-07, I began exploring applied aspects of wireless communication technology, including software-defined radio (SDR), which has many applications.

g fettweisJanuary 2017 

Gerhard Fettweis is co-chair of the IEEE 5G Initiative and a member of the IEEE Communications Society. Fettweis also serves as Senior Research Scientist at the International Computer Science Institute and as Vodafone Chair Professor at Dresden University of Technology. In this interview, Fettweis provides his perspective on 5G technology issues and the commercial opportunities it will support.

Question: The development of 5G cellular networks will bring new data speeds, lower latency, and a new level of network capacity, flexibility, and manageability. How will those advanced capabilities be put to use?

Ashutosh Dutta croppedDecember 2016

Ashutosh Dutta is co-chair of the IEEE Future Directions 5G Initiative and the IEEE Communications Society’s Industry Outreach Director. In the private sector, Dutta serves as Lead Member of Technical Staff(LMTS) at AT&T. In this interview, Dutta provides insight into the 5G Initiative’s work and the challenges presented by the development of 5G-related technologies.

Question: Would you provide an overview of the IEEE’s 5G Initiative and its current activities?

Ashutosh Dutta croppedg fettweisNovember 2016

Ashutosh Dutta and Gerhard Fettweis are co-chairs of the IEEE Future Directions 5G Initiative and both are members of the IEEE Communications Society. In the private sector, Dutta currently serves as Lead Member of Technical Staff at AT&T. Fettweis serves as Senior Research Scientist at the International Computer Science Institute and as Vodafone Chair Professor at Dresden University of Technology. In this interview, the two scientists discuss the topic of 5G and its opportunities and challenges. 

Question: What is 5G and why has IEEE Future Directions created an initiative based on it?